SportsMed Orthopaedic Group, Inc.
SportsMed Orthopaedic Group, Inc.
SportsMed Orthopaedic Group, Inc.
Welcome to SportsMed Orthopaedic Group, Inc.
Below are some guidelines and protocols that most patients can follow. Each patient may have a slightly different program tailored to their age and the level of repair that was done. You should always start out gradually and work your way up to heavier weights or longer activities. Stretching should be done routinely as directed by your physician or therapist, and warm-up exercises are advised before more vigorous activities. If you have specific questions about resuming an activity or sport that is not addressed below, please ask your doctor first. Arthroscopic Decompression
of Acromion or AC Joint

(Subacromial decompression or Mumford)

Sling:
A sling is provided for comfort. This is usually worn only for 2-3 days. The sling may be worn when out in public for comfort and protection for up to two weeks however.

Range of Motion:
Weeks 1-6 emphasize shoulder flexion, extension, and rotation exercises. These should be performed 3x/day until full motion has returned and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction the week after surgery. Start using the bands or weights after three weeks when motion returns and comfort improves. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation exercises. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors two weeks later. Continue until full strength and function have returned. Perform these exercises at least 4x/week for 30-60 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Swimming can resume after four weeks. Overhead sports usually resume at week six to eight.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work the week of surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve heavy lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately three months.

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Labral Debridement

Sling:
A sling is provided for comfort. This is usually worn only for 2-3 days. The sling may be worn when out in public for comfort and protection for up to two weeks however.

Range of Motion:
Weeks 1-6 emphasize shoulder flexion, extension, and rotation exercises. These should be performed 3x/day until full motion has returned and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction the week after surgery. Start using the bands or weights after three weeks when motion returns and comfort improves. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation exercises. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors two weeks later. Continue until full strength and function have returned. Perform these exercises at least 4x/week for 30-60 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Swimming can resume after four weeks. Overhead sports usually resume at week six to eight.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work the week of surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve heavy lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately three months.

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Labral Repair or Bankart (Shoulder Stabilization)

Immobilizer:
The immobilizer is worn for six weeks unless specifically told otherwise. This may be removed for showers and if sitting carefully around the house or work. When the immobilizer is off, you must be conscientious to avoid lifting the arm or rotating past the neutral (tin-soldier) position. You can type and do simple tasks within the "nose-to-toes triangle" as comfort permits. You should not do any lifting, pushing, or pulling with this arm for the first six weeks. Your elbow and wrist should be flexed and extended 4-5x/day to alleviate swelling and stiffness.

Range of Motion:
Stretching begins at week six. This should be performed twice a day until motion has normalized and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction six weeks after surgery. Start using the bands or weights around week nine when motion returns and comfort improves. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation exercises. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors two weeks later. Continue until full strength and function have returned. Perform these exercises at least 4x/week for 30-60 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm and the doctor has given clearance. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Swimming can resume after eight weeks. Overhead sports usually resume at five to six months. Contact sports must be avoided for at least six months.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work the week of surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve heavy lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately three months.

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Rotator Cuff Repair

Immobilizer:
The immobilizer is worn for six weeks unless specifically told otherwise. This may be removed for showers and if sitting carefully around the house or work. When the immobilizer is off, you must be conscientious to avoid lifting the arm or rotating past the neutral (tin-soldier) position. You can type and do simple tasks within the "nose-to-toes triangle" as comfort permits. You should not do any lifting, pushing, or pulling with this arm for the first six weeks. Your elbow and wrist should be flexed and extended 4-5x/day to alleviate swelling and stiffness.

Range of Motion:
Pulley and pendulum exercises should be started the day after surgery and done 3x/day. More formal stretching begins at week six. This should be performed twice a day until motion has normalized and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction three months after surgery. Start using the bands or weights two weeks later. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation exercises. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors at four months. Continue until full strength and function have returned. Perform these exercises at least 4x/week for 30-60 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm and the doctor has given clearance. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Gentle swimming can resume after three months. Overhead sports usually resume at five to six months.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work the week of surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve repetitive lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately four months.

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Labral (SLAP) Repair

Immobilizer:
The immobilizer is worn for six weeks unless specifically told otherwise. This may be removed for showers and if sitting carefully around the house or work. When the immobilizer is off, you must be conscientious to avoid lifting the arm or rotating past the neutral (tin-soldier) position. You can type and do simple tasks with the arm at your side. You should not do any lifting, pushing, or pulling with this arm for the first six weeks. Your wrist should be flexed and extended 4-5x/day to alleviate swelling and stiffness. The elbow can be moved 4-5x/day with your opposite arm.

Range of Motion:
Stretching begins at week six. This should be performed twice daily until motion has normalized and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction six weeks after surgery. Start using the bands or weights around week nine when motion returns and comfort improves. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation exercises. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors two weeks later. Biceps strengthening can be started after three months. Continue until full strength and function have returned. Perform these exercises at least 4x/week for 30-60 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm and the doctor has given clearance. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Swimming can resume after eight weeks. Overhead sports usually resume at five to six months. Gentle throwing can be started at this time as well. Contact sports are avoided for six months.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work the week of surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve heavy lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately three months.

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Biceps Release

Sling:
A sling is provided for comfort. This is usually worn only for 2-3 days. The sling may be worn when out in public for comfort and protection for up to two weeks however.

Range of Motion:
Weeks 1-6 emphasize shoulder flexion, extension, and rotation exercises. These should be performed 3x/day until full motion has returned and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction the week after surgery. Start using the bands or weights after three weeks when motion returns and comfort improves. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation exercises. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors two weeks later. Continue until full strength and function has returned. Perform these exercises at least 4x/week for 30-60 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Swimming can resume after four weeks. Overhead sports usually resume at week six.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work the week of surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve heavy lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately six weeks.

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Capsular Release or Manipulation (Frozen Shoulder)

Sling:
A sling is provided for comfort but should be discontinued within 48 hours. The sling may be worn when out in public for comfort and protection for up to two weeks however.

Range of Motion:
Weeks 1-12 emphasize shoulder flexion, extension, and rotation exercises. These should be performed 3x/day until full motion has returned and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction two weeks after surgery. Start using the bands or weights one month after surgery. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors two weeks later. Continue until full strength and function has returned. Perform 3x/week for 30 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Swimming can resume after four weeks. Overhead sports usually resume at week eight as comfort allows.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work the week after surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve repetitive lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately three months.

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AC Joint Reconstruction

Immobilizer:
The immobilizer is worn for six weeks unless specifically told otherwise. This may be removed for showers and if sitting carefully around the house or work. When the immobilizer is off, you must be conscientious to avoid lifting the arm or rotating past the neutral (tin-soldier) position. You can type and do simple tasks within the "nose-to-toes triangle" as comfort permits. You should not do any lifting, pushing, or pulling with this arm for the first six weeks. Your elbow and wrist should be flexed and extended 4-5x/day to alleviate swelling and stiffness.

Range of Motion:
Stretching begins at week six. This should be performed 2x/day until motion has normalized and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction six weeks after surgery. Start using the bands or weights around week nine when motion returns and comfort improves. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation exercises. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors two weeks later. Continue until full strength and function have returned. Perform at least 3x/week for 30 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm and the doctor has given clearance. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Swimming can resume after eight weeks. Overhead sports usually resume at four months. Contact sports should be avoided for five to six months.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work the week of surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve heavy lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately three months.

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Partial or Total Shoulder Replacement

Sling:
A sling is provided for comfort. This is usually worn only for 2-3 days. The sling may be worn when out in public for comfort and protection for up to two weeks however. Limit your external rotation to neutral for the first month.

Range of Motion:
Pulley and pendulum exercises are started the week of surgery. More formal stretching is started at week 4-6 with shoulder flexion, extension, and rotation exercises. These should be performed twice a day until full motion has returned and then 3x/week for maintenance.

Strengthening:
Begin with isometrics in flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, and abduction six weeks after surgery. Start using the bands or at two months when motion returns and comfort improves. At first, perform flexion, internal rotation, and external rotation. Add strengthening of the deltoid, scapular stabilizers, and extensors two weeks later. Continue until full strength and function have returned. Perform at least 4x/week for 30-60 minutes/day.

Return to Sport:
Patients may return to regular activities when their strength and motion are at least 90% of the normal arm. Aerobic conditioning such as stationary bicycling can be started in the second week after surgery. Swimming can resume after six weeks.

Return to Work:
Patients with low demand jobs often return to work several weeks after surgery. Patients who have higher demand jobs that involve heavy lifting or overhead activities will return to work when they feel comfortable and secure, usually after approximately three months.